Prenatal Risk Factors and Hyperlipidemia in Children in Two Urban Multiethnic Community Hospitals

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Submission ID :
ESPR460
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Abstract: :

Background: Hypercholesterolemia (HC) confers increased risk for atherosclerotic coronary vascular disease. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, prevalence of HC among children and adolescents aged 6-19 years is around 7% and varying with ethnicity and gender. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends universal cholesterol screening between 9-11 yrs and again between 17-21 yrs due to growing epidemic of obesity. There are limited data on prenatal risk factors associated with development of hyperlipidemia.


Objective: To explore prenatal risk factors in children with hyperlipidemia in two urban multiethnic community hospitals.


Design/Methods: Retrospective case control study of children born between November 2011 and August 2020 at Flushing Hospital Medical Center and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center with serum lipid screen. Data extracted from EHR included maternal age, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI) maternal comorbidities, child's gestational age (GA), birth weight (BW), and gender. Cases (G1) were children with cholesterol >200 mg/dL and controls (G2) were children with cholesterol <170 mg/dL. Children with illness or on medications known to alter serum lipid levels were excluded. Data were analyzed using chi square, Mann-Whitney and logistic regression, p<0.05 was considered significant.


Results: Of 131 children with cholesterol >200 mg/dL on lipid screen, 69 met inclusion criteria for G1. G2 included equal number of age matched controls. Mean (SD) age was 5.2 (1.9) yrs.  Comparison between G1 and G2 revealed male gender (51 vs 46%, p=0.73), ethnicity {Hispanic (59 vs 63%), African American (17 vs 13%), Asian/Indian (15 vs 12%), p=0.67}. Median GA {39.0 (37.6-39.0) vs 39.4 (38.7-40.0) wks, p=0.02}, BW {3246.0 (2799.0-3640.0) vs 3274.0 (2941.5-3650.0) grams, p=0.75}, child's BMI %ile {93.8 (50.1-99.3) vs 88.9 (44.9-98.0), p=0.29}, maternal age {29.0 (24.5-34.0) vs 26 (23.5-31.0) yrs, p=0.05}, maternal BMI {31.8 (27.7-36.2) vs 29.8 (26.9-32.9) kg/m, p=0.41}. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (A1 8.7 vs 4.5%, p=0.33, A2 10.1 vs 6.0%, p=0.04), hypothyroidism 6.0 vs 0%, p=0.04), pregnancy induced hypertension 10.0 vs 6.0%, p=0.34). Regression revealed maternal BMI the only independent predictor of group (OR=0.928, p=0.05). 

Conclusions: In our small multiethnic sample, higher maternal BMI predicted risk of HC in childhood. GA, BW, GDM, hypothyroidism and pregnancy induced hypertension were not prenatal risk factors predicting HC.

Flushing Hospital Medical Center
Flushing Hospital Medical Center
Flushing Hospital Medical Center
Flushing Hospital Medical Center
Flushing Hospital Medical Center
New York Institution of Technology
Flushing Hospital Medical Center
Flushing Hospital Medical Center

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