Pediatric Residency Preparedness for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship: A Survey of Fellowship Program and Associate Program Directors

This submission has open access
Submission ID :
ESPR384
Submission Type
Submission Topic
Abstract: :

Background: Over the past decade, there has been a steadily increasing interest in the field of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) among pediatric residents. While some residency programs provide curriculum tracks that offer training opportunities in a specific subspecialty, there are requirements pediatric residents must complete prior to graduation that may or may not pertain to their ultimate subspecialty of choice. The current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements are for a minimum of 3 months of PEM rotations.


Objective: To examine the perception of PEM program directors (PDs) and associate PDs (APDs) regarding the preparedness of new PEM fellows who have graduated from pediatric residency programs.


Design/Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of PEM fellowship PDs and APDs. A 26-item validated survey was electronically distributed from November to December 2019 and consisted of five domains: professionalism, autonomy, psychomotor skills, clinical evaluation and management, and academia/scholarship. A 5-point Likert scale rated PD/APD agreement regarding an incoming fellows' ability to perform each task.


Results: 48/119 (40%) eligible PDs & APDs responded. Most respondents were from programs with 6-10 total fellows (60%) and from urban areas (94%). Most programs (56%) have a clinical competency committee of <5 faculty members. The majority of respondents strongly agreed or agreed that fellows perform adequately in areas of professionalism, independence, and clinical evaluation and management; the only exception was intraosseous (IO) and intubation performance (Fig 1). There were similar results in the psychomotor domain regarding indications, contraindications, and equipment knowledge. However, in psychomotor skill performance, there was a shift to neutral to disagree for certain skills (IO placement and intubation). There were also more neutral to disagree responses in the academia/scholarship domain. The majority of PDs (54%) feel that current pediatric residency training is strong to very strong (Fig 2).


Conclusions: Overall, PEM fellowship PDs & APDs feel that incoming PEM fellows are adequately trained in the areas of professionalism, independence, and clinical evaluation and management. There are areas of improvement within psychomotor skill performance and academia and scholarship. 

Optional insertion of tables and or figures :
If the file does not load, click here to open/download the file.
If the file does not load, click here to open/download the file.
Yale University School of Medicine
Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Section of Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine

Similar Abstracts by Type

Submission ID
Submission Title
Submission Topic
Submission Type
Corresponding Author
ESPR157
Clinical Research
Original science
Aditya Chhikara
ESPR302
Epidemiology
Original science
Natasha Jouk
ESPR74
Clinical Research
Original science
Alexandra Mazo
17 hits