Educating and Empowering Inner-City High School Students in Bleeding Control

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Submission ID :
ESPR169
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Abstract: :

Background: Unintentional bleeding is the leading cause of death in the population of those 1 to 44 years of age in the United States. Stop the Bleed campaign is a nationwide course that teaches the public to ensure their own safety, call 911, find the bleeding injury and compress.  Although the national campaign for Stop the Bleed training course was inspired by active shooter events, it can be applied to scenarios such as motor vehicle accidents and small-scale penetrating and gunshot wounds. Extending the audience to inner city high school students in a violence-stricken neighborhood has the potential to be life-saving if they are first on the scene. We hypothesized that students educated using the Stop the Bleed course would have an increase in their comfort level, willingness and preparedness to intervene in an acute bleeding scenario after taking the course.

Objectives: To evaluate the comfort level, willingness and preparedness of inner-city high school students to control acute bleeding, pre and post Stop the Bleed training course. 


Methods: This was a prospective interventional pilot study in one inner-city high school in Brooklyn, New York. Students were given the option to participate in the Stop the Bleed course with pre and post surveys.  286 students were recruited from their physical education or health education class to take part in the 50-minute bleeding control training course. Mean age was 15.7 years old. Students were separated into groups of 20-25 and taught by 2-3 Emergency Medicine or Trauma Surgery providers certified as Stop the Bleed instructors. Each course included 2-3 skills stations for placing a tourniquet, wound packing and pressure control.   


Results:  Prior to the course, only 30.6% were somewhat likely and 13.17% were very likely to help an injured person that was bleeding. After the course, 52.27% of respondents were somewhat likely and 20.83% of respondents were very likely to help a bleeding person, even if no bleeding control kit was available to them. Post intervention, there were significant improvements in self-rated comfort level, willingness and preparedness of bleeding control training participants. Using the McNemar test, it was shown that as compared to before taking the course, high school students who partook in Stop the Bleed self-rated as more likely, more comfortable, and prepared to help an injured person that is bleeding (family, friend or stranger), and less worried about causing harm to such an individual, all with p values <0.0001.   


Conclusion:  Teaching the Stop the Bleed course to high school students from a community stricken with high levels of violence resulted in an increase in comfort, willingness and preparedness to be involved with bleeding control. This study can potentially impact clinical practice for paramedics and Emergency Medicine providers by decreasing blood loss helping to save a life while empowering the youth. 


Key Words: stop the bleed, youth, inner city, empower






Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center

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